Maternal Health Problem in Kenya

HIGH MATERNAL & CHILD MORTALITY

Kenya is amongst the 10 most dangerous countries for pregnant women. Between 6000 and 8000 women die every year during childbirth; the current maternal mortality rate is 488 deaths per 100,000 live births. Kenya has made little progress in reducing this to achieve the commitment set in the MDGs of 147 deaths per 100,000

LOW DOCTOR-PATIENT RATIO

The doctor-patient ratio in Kenya is one doctor to 6,545 of the population ( Kenya Medical Practitioners and Dentists Board) as opposed to the recommended one doctor for every 1000 patients by the World Health Organization (WHO). This clearly shows a massive gap with an enormous need that must be met; and it is to meet this need that BabyMed was created

LACK OF COMMUNITY KNOWLEDGE

There remains a lack of collective community knowledge for safe and healthy pregnancy and 75% of the Kenya population lives in rural areas, often far from well-equipped health facilities with trained personnel. This broad portion of the population therefore has limited access to face-to-face coaching on healthy pregnancy and newborn child care

Kenya is amongst the 10 most dangerous countries for pregnant women. Between 6000 and 8000 women die every year during childbirth; the current maternal mortality rate is 488 deaths per 100,000 live births. Kenya has made little progress in reducing this to achieve the commitment set in the Millennium Development Goals of 147 deaths per 100,000.

At 582,650 square kilometers, Kenya is comprised of great diversity in environment and infrastructure. The vast geographic terrain poses challenges to the population of nearly 45 million people in accessing basic services, such as maternal and child healthcare

For this reason, there is a great need for innovative solutions to tackle the health care problems of African nations, particularly in the area of child and maternal health. These innovative solutions could save many of the 800 women a day who die of preventable problems related to pregnancy and childbirth, most of them in developing countries. Growing evidence indicates that many of these deaths could be avoided through better information and access to skilled birth attendants – or urgent care helped by the use of mobile phones and messaging services.

Furthermore, the doctor-patient ratio in Kenya is one doctor to 17,000 of the population as opposed to the recommended one doctor for every 1000 patients by the World Health Organization. This clearly shows a massive gap with an enormous need that must be met; and it is to meet this need that BabyMed was created.

There also remains a lack of collective community knowledge for safe and healthy pregnancy and 75% of the Kenya population lives in rural areas, often far from well-equipped health facilities with trained personnel. This broad portion of the population therefore has limited access to face-to-face coaching on healthy pregnancy. The World Health Organization also recognizes that a lack of information is a contributing factor to women not getting the care they need. A first-time mother is especially vulnerable. She is younger, less experienced, and often feels isolated and less empowered amid her husband’s family. Mobile messages delivered via voice or text are a simple way to inform, support, and educate her with accurate health information

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